Over the last couple of years, the social sciences have been increasingly interested in using computer-based tools to analyze the complexity of the social ant farm that is the Web. Issuecrawler was one of the first of such tools and today researchers are indeed using very sophisticated pieces of software to “see” the Web. Sciences-Po, one of these rather strange french institutions that were founded to educate the elite but which now have to increasingly justify their existence by producing research, has recently hired Bruno Latour to head their new médialab, which will most probably head into that very direction. Given Latour’s background (and the fact that Paul Girard, a very competent former colleague at my lab, heads the R&D departement), this should be really very interesting. I do hope that there will be occasion to tackle the most compelling methodological question when in comes to the application of computers (or mathematics in general) to analyzing human life, which is beautifully framed in a rather reluctant statement from 1889 by Karl Pearson, a major figure in the history of statistics:

“Personally I ought to say that there is, in my own opinion, considerable danger in applying the methods of exact science to problems in descriptive science, whether they be problems of heredity or of political economy; the grace and logical accuracy of the mathematical processes are apt to so fascinate the descriptive scientist that he seeks for sociological hypotheses which fit his mathematical reasoning and this without first ascertaining whether the basis of his hypotheses is as broad as that human life to which the theory is to be applied.” cit. in. Stigler, Stephen M.: The History of Statistics. Harvard University Press, 1990 p. 304

Post filed under actor-network theory, epistemolgy, network theory, statistics.

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